Gallery

Metro UI applied to enterprise apps : Convergence 2012

Microsoft has just demoed a working prototype of a Microsoft Dynamics GP ERP, running on Windows 8, with a full Metro UI:

This is the first example of an enterprise app for the Windows 8 metro ‘wall’. More info about the demo is available at ZDNet.

The one hour keynote is available online behind a short registration form at msconvergence.com (demos start around 40 minutes in).

21 thoughts on “Metro UI applied to enterprise apps : Convergence 2012

  1. Pingback: Microsoft zeigt Dynamics-Geschäftsanwendungen im Windows-8-Metro-Stil | 360° Sharepoint Blog

  2. Pingback: Microsoft shows off Windows 8 business app ‘concepts’ | Webluc

  3. Pingback: Convergence 2012 Houston | mahir.nl

  4. Pingback: Windows 8 talks Business | Windows 7 Bucharest

  5. Completely unusable for real business use. Good for dashboards, but general use nope.

    I hate how everything is going “metro” and forcing metro upon EVERYTHING when it doesn’t make sense. Do you do all your day to day business on a tablet with a touchscreen? Nope didn’t think so. Real business is still done with a keyboard and a mouse. Thanks MS for hyping another useless feature and making Metro UI the default on regular PC’s when it should ONLY be the default on touchscreen devices.

    • Yep, when it comes to high volume transaction processing etc – real business will be done with a KB & Mouse. Looking at these demos, it’s pretty clear that many of these metro screens are actually designed for that use case. The demo made it pretty clear.

      So yeah, not sure – I’d want to give the UI a go before I complain about it, but I would be thinking about pretty much the same concerns.

      Overall, using a Windows 8 tablet regularly myself, and having owned a Windows Phone in the past (switched back to iPhone), I have to say the Metro UI is slowly winning me over: my iPhone/iPad are starting to feel old and dated by comparison.

    • hmm… only matter of time… real business may soon be done using mobiles… just because mobile came later than PC does not mean real business will always be done by PC.

  6. @arrticulation

    I dont think you get it. Metro is used for what it is good for, and provides “windows” into your normal desktop application so that you can use those things which require traditional interaction in exactly the same way they are now for Windows 7.

    So this means the best of both worlds… it means you get an instant “snapshot” of what is going on with the application dashboard, without needing to actually enter the application and wait for it to load, as well as being able to dive into it and work normally whenever you like. Whats more, for those things specifically written in metro, the experience you have on your desktop is IDENTICAL to what you have on the table and again on the phone, making it a consistent journey through all devices.

    To me, this is GOLD. It means all of my devices can run the same applications and I can switch without problems between all 3 of them (especially if they are using the cloud for storage). So I can grab my phone and review the latest report, then switch to the desktop because I need to do something complex and involved, and then on the way home I can grab my tablet and work through other things.

    The point is that with Metro the choice is MINE, not someone elses. I am not restricted to one device, or chained to a desktop because that is the ONLY interface possible, and I am not frustrated by having one version for the tablet and a different version for the phone (Compare Facebook to iPhone/iPad facebook and you will know what I mean) with different functionality.

    Too often (as a developer of 15 years) a GUI has far too much packed into it, with so much going on and too many controls and decisions to be made. It becomes unusable because of its complexity rather than simplifying things by allowing you to focus purely on one task at a time.

    We have always been told… “K.I.S.S” (Keep it Simple Stupid).

    Finally microsoft have embraced this paragon of technology and I think it is paying off!

    • Totally agree with your comment… Whether you like it or not, services are going mobile with the whole concept of “accessible from anywhere, any device” being pushed from all angles…
      People accessing data from mobile devices need a clear and consistent interface to get to their data, even if it is a simplified version, and will not be able to plug in a mouse and keyboard every time they need to open a report or check their emails, etc…
      Being in IT, I don’t buy into the marketing hype but we are in the middle of a revolution where the end user is starting to move away from the conventional mouse and keyboard. People like you and me will still need the full desktop for complex tasks though…

  7. Pingback: Android SDK updated, enterprise Metro apps, debugging Maps » HD Network Technology Blog

  8. Pingback: Can Microsoft Metro make beautiful business software? - Enterprise IT Watch Blog

    • Hi Miike – you may be right. Initial reports said that this was GP, but now those reports seem to have been changed. I have changed it to the generic, as it wasn’t made clear in the keynote which product was being demoed.

  9. Pingback: Developers: will you do Metro? « Tim Anderson’s ITWriting

  10. Pingback: Hablando de Metro con los chicos del Mad.nug | Roberto.luis@UAM

  11. Pingback: Can Microsoft Metro make beautiful business software? – Enterprise IT Watch Blog | Get Free Software

Add-SPComment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s